Institute of Learning Styles Research

Dissertation Abstracts

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Abstract Title

Coolidge-Parker, J. (1989). A comparison of perceived and objectively measured perceptual learning style modality elements of court reporters and court reporting students (Doctoral dissertation, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 1989). Dissertation Abstracts International, 50(07A), 1896.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify, assess, and contrast dominant and preferred learning styles of court reporting students and court reporters. Specific emphasis was placed on the roles of the aural and haptic elements in court reporting.

Subjects were administered two tests of perceptual learning style modality elements. The Multi-Modal Paired Associates Learning Test (MMPALT II) is an objective examination, which measures performance on specific perceptual modality elements to assess individual strengths and weaknesses. The Productivity Environmental Preference Survey (PEPS) is a subjective evaluation, which measures a subject’s perceived preferred perceptual modality elements.

On the MMPALT II, both groups scored highest on the visual element and lowest on the kinesthetic element. On the PEPS, however, both groups indicated that the kinesthetic element was their highest perceived preferred element.

On the MMPALT II, both groups scored highest on the visual element and lowest on the kinesthetic element. On the PEPS, however, both groups indicated that the kinesthetic element was their highest perceived preferred element.

Statistical analyses using t-tests were conducted to determine if there were significant differences between the performances of the two groups. No significant differences were found between the performances of the two groups on either of the two tests; however, there were some observable differences in rank order noted.

Correlation studies were conducted to determine if there were significant differences between the performances of each of the two groups on the two instruments. These studies revealed only slight correlation between the performances of the court reporting students on the haptic element of the two tests. No other correlations were found. It appears that the two types of instruments administered did measure two different aspects of learning style.

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